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King Charles III to be treated for enlarged prostate: Palace

UK's King Charles III diagnosed with cancer: Buckingham Palace
Source: Video Screenshot

British head of state King Charles III will attend hospital next week for a corrective procedure to treat an enlarged prostate, Buckingham Palace said Wednesday.

“In common with thousands of men each year, The King has sought treatment for an enlarged prostate,” said a palace statement.

“His Majesty’s condition is benign and he will attend hospital next week for a corrective procedure,” it added.

The 75 year-old monarch’s public engagements will be postponed for “a short period of recuperation,” said the palace.

Charles became king upon the death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, on September 8, 2022.

He is the oldest person to become Britain’s monarch, having been the longest-serving heir apparent.

The king, whose mother died aged 96 and father died aged 99, has generally enjoyed good health, although has twice been struck down by coronavirus and suffered sporting injuries when he was younger.

Benign prostate enlargement is common in men aged over 50, is not related to cancer and is “not usually a serious threat to health”, according to Britain’s National Health Service.

Symptoms include a frequent need to pass water and difficulty in fully emptying the bladder.

The cause is unknown, “but it’s believed to be linked to hormonal changes as a man gets older,” said the NHS website.

The palace statement came around an hour after it was revealed that the Princess of Wales is facing up to two weeks in hospital and several months’ recuperation having undergone successful abdominal surgery.

The 42-year-old wife of William, Prince of Wales, heir to the British throne, was admitted to a private clinic in central London on Tuesday, said Kensington Palace.

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AFP

Agence France-Presse (AFP) is a French international news agency headquartered in Paris, France. Founded in 1835 as Havas, it is the world's oldest news agency.







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