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Pakistan accuses India of extra-judicial killings on its soil

Pakistan mobile network being restored after day-long election blackout: govt
Source: Pixabay

Islamabad said it has “credible evidence” of links between Indian agents and the extra-judicial killings of two of its nationals in Pakistan, after Western governments accused New Delhi of links to assassination attempts on their soil.

The allegations are linked to the deaths of two men shot dead at mosques in separate attacks in Pakistan last year.

“Indian agents used technology and safe havens on foreign soil to commit assassinations in Pakistan,” Islamabad’s caretaker Foreign Secretary Sajjad Qazi told a press conference in the capital on Thursday.

“They recruited, financed and supported criminals, terrorists and unsuspecting civilians to play defined roles in these assassinations,” he said, adding several men had been arrested.

But the government did not provide details of the documentary, financial and forensic evidence it said it possesses and gave no further information on the subsequent trials of those arrested.

The Indian foreign ministry dismissed Pakistan’s allegations as “false and malicious anti-India propaganda” late on Thursday.

“As the world knows, Pakistan has long been the epicentre of terrorism, organised crime, and illegal transnational activities,” it said in a statement.

“India and many other countries have publicly warned Pakistan cautioning that it would be consumed by its own culture of terror and violence.”

Islamabad’s claims come after the United States and Canada last year accused Indian agents of links to assassination attempts in their territory.

Arch-rivals Pakistan and India have fought three wars since the subcontinent was partitioned in 1947, and regularly trade allegations of espionage and malfeasance.

 

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AFP

Agence France-Presse (AFP) is a French international news agency headquartered in Paris, France. Founded in 1835 as Havas, it is the world's oldest news agency.







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